Pythagorean home amidst olive grove offers views & protection

Asked by an couple to design a home embedded in their olive grove, architect used geometry to respect the trees, provide protection from wind and sun, and open up the residence to the mountain views.

In Alice in Wonderland fashion, the home begins small at a tip of a triangle where the walls are low. The walls grow and stretch as the home progresses uphill funneling views toward the Gerania mountains.

On two sides of the triangle the only openings are slits which let in protected light and views (all other windows open out onto one of two interior courtyards. At the mountain-side of the home, the wall is nearly double the size of the smaller end, and the glass can be completely opened to let the olive trees in.

In symbiosis with the local ecosystem, the home is covered in a , adjusted to the Greek climatic conditions, in particular those of Attica with lavender, helichrysum, auras, drosanthemum and thyme. Inside the courtyards there is no grass, but all local plantings and walkways of rammed earth.

https://www.tensearchitecture.net/

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21 Comments

  1. Well, it offers a view but no real protection. Concrete, metal and a ton of glass living in a human fish tank. Even though this looks horribly simplistic I bet it cost a fortune.

    • > I bet it cost a fortune.

      I wonder it looks luxurious, but is it? There are minimal walls and corners and jogs, that adds to the cost. A lot of glass, but mostly walls covered with closets and curtains. Not expensive to furnish. I like the bedroom with just a bed. Pull up some floor to sit and relax. I guess thinking about it I wonder if there is a frightful amount of glare from those windows – but that could be controlled with tinting, or curtains too.

  2. Wouldn’t be impressed if I had only seen a few pictures, but the storytelling and the poetry of the owner and architect really carry over their experience. The waterways and roof also make it so different from what it seems at first glance. Well done!

  3. Do guests get dropped in by helicopter, or hike over the mountain?
    Just joking….I saw a separate building down the path the second time around.

  4. Kristen, I have watched your videos for a few years now and always appreciate the uniqueness of individual homes you share with us. This one captures my imagination in special ways: my college in Southern California had a large olive grove planted to one side of the varied concrete halls, library, and dormitories. We had paths to walk among the beautiful trees with their ripening fruit – a connection to ancient Mid-Eastern history – that we enjoyed in season and quiet places for meditation. This gorgeous home with its stunning setting vividly reminds me of that lovely, precious time and place. Thank you!

  5. 13:00 wouldn’t it be beautiful without those grey, tall walls? If they have removed them it would be much happier and enjoyable…

  6. Architectural philosophy.

    What I like: large window wall that opens completely, the view, minimalism of the furniture, one level room arrangement, spacious, roof garden…

    What I don’t like: triangular wall structure, the first thing you see when you go through the main entrance is the bed room, triangular showers and any sharp corners.

    In the end, the most important thing is that the owners are happy with the design and I got the impression that this lady is very happy. ☺️

  7. Nature abhors a strait line…

    I like their view of the mountain & large living room window but I’d rather hire the people who make Zoo animal enclosures to build me a fake rock home, the outside would be indistinguishable from a natural rock outcrop, complete with cave like openings for the windows & doors, plant life & so on…

    You’d never know it was a house

    Inside would be a house/cave fusion with interior tree, plants, waterfall

    Oh…I rambled, sorry

  8. The past and the future meet in the present. Traditional farming and modern design. Cool combo, edgy yet rustic!

  9. 2:22 : don’t see any disaster … they have healthy olive tree, bad weather ended in weak production but the trees are still here, they should get that as a life lesson on “not putting all your eggs in the same basket … especially in an extremly dry environment

  10. Did they say in what direction does the open side face? North or northeast perhaps because sun beating in there all day or the western setting sun would be like an oven.

  11. how much is electricity price in that area in Creece?
    total costs with electricity in year?
    I see few solar panels… . do you use them heating dusc water?
    where wc waters are going?

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